Four Panel Friday: J.R.R.Tolkien’s drawings of Entrances to the Elvenking’s halls



Ok. These aren’t exactly comic panels.

But the more I go through old books during this time spent at home, the more I discover “four panels” in other parts of literature.

Tolkien’s perspective and line variation are impressive. He incorporates straight lines, diagonal and curved lines, stipples, blacked out inks.

The man was non-stop.

From: The Art of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

By: Wayne G. Hammond, Christina Scull

Four Panel Friday, plus a cover, and an extra panel (on Sunday): All Star Squadron #28



I remember this All Star Squadron issue being a Justice League comic. Turns out it’s the Justice Society.

Justice who? What kind of bench warming Justice League is this?

Hold up. Learn your comics history J.

The Justice Society was the first superhero team to ever appear in D.C. Comics.

They’re the godfather and godmothers of the superhero team-up game. Respect due.

From: All Star Squadron #28

By: Roy Thomas, Richard Howell, and Gerald Forton

Four Panel Friday (on Sunday): Jeff Smith’s Bone


Hilarity ensues

“Roughs” from Jeff Smith’s Bone. Probably the most polished roughs in history.

As a kid, catching a glimpse of a cartoonist’s rough pages provided endless inspiration and encouragement.

My mind melted when I discovered perfect panels didn’t immediately flow from the brushes of master cartoonists.

From: The Art of Bone

By: Jeff Smith

James Thurber’s Idling


To release some of his jumpy energy and his mind’s ceaseless inventorying and inquisitiveness, Thurber drew. It was as habitual as his smoking. Writing-rewriting, as he often called it- required discipline, focus, research, an amped-up armature of full brain power that included memory, grammar, word and sentence sounds, a dialing in of the humorous of and the heartfelt, the meandering and the meaningful. But drawings? He considered his to be fluid, spontaneous, unhindered, and with rarely a need for erasure, revision, or polish. His daughter Rosemary remembers her father saying that he could even whistle while he drew.

A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber, by Michael J. Rosen

If you’re looking for some artistic inspiration, or need to smile, pick up A Mile and a Half of Lines. After skimming through five or ten pages you’ll be feening to pick up a pencil and draw.