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Art comics Commonplace Book Drawings writer's inspiration

Seth’s storytelling advice to Noah Van Sciver. And you too, if you’d like…

Write about losers and loners. Don’t get dragged down that road of trying to resist your natural inclinations.

Seth

Noah Van Sciver has a YouTube channel.

Yeah!

The prolific cartoonist generously shares his works in progress, conversations with colleagues, and on occasion, words of encouragement.

A few days ago he read a letter of storytelling advice from fellow cartoonist, Seth.

Warning!

The letter contradicts most storytelling advice you’ve heard.

Keep drawing y’all.

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amreading architecture Art Commonplace Book Drawings

Drawing Lessons from Architect Matthew Frederick pt.3 Architectural Hand-Lettering


Handwriting, penmanship, this is all drawing. Hand-lettering can be another artistic tool to add to your kit.

Matthew Frederick shares 6 architectural hand-lettering principals to follow:

1. Honor legibility and consistency above all else.

2. Use guide lines (actual or imagined) to ensure uniformity.

3. Emphasize the beginning and end of all strokes, and overlap them slightly where they meet – just as in drawing lines.

4. Give your horizontal strokes a slight upward tilt. If they slope downward, your letters will look tired.

5. Give curved strokes a balloon-like fullness.

6. Give careful attention to the amount of white space between letters. An E, for example, will need more space when following an I than when coming after an S or T.

Matthew Frederick

This week, for fun, find ways to practice your architectural hand-lettering.

Write a thank-you note.

Write a love letter.

Write a haiku.

Then mail it out it to your lover, mother, or bestie.

Be sure to practice your hand-lettering on the to and from address on the envelope as well.

You’ll get some practice in, and they will receive a special gift.

Source: 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School, Matthew Frederick, pg 22

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amreading Commonplace Book Drawings interviews writer's inspiration

Gabriel García Márquez on how drawing led to writing.

INTERVIEWER

How did you start writing?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ

By drawing. By drawing cartoons. Before I could read or write I used to draw comics at school and at home. The funny thing is that I now realize that when I was in high school I had the reputation of being a writer, though I never in fact wrote anything. If there was a pamphlet to be written or a letter of petition, I was the one to do it because I was supposedly the writer. When I entered college I happened to have a very good literary background in general, considerably above the average of my friends. At the university in Bogotá, I started making new friends and acquaintances, who introduced me to contemporary writers. One night a friend lent me a book of short stories by Franz Kafka. I went back to the pension where I was staying and began to read The Metamorphosis. The first line almost knocked me off the bed. I was so surprised. The first line reads, “As Gregor Samsa awoke that morning from uneasy dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect. . . .” When I read the line I thought to myself that I didn’t know anyone was allowed to write things like that. If I had known, I would have started writing a long time ago. So I immediately started writing short stories. They are totally intellectual short stories because I was writing them on the basis of my literary experience and had not yet found the link between literature and life. The stories were published in the literary supplement of the newspaper El Espectador in Bogotá and they did have a certain success at the time—probably because nobody in Colombia was writing intellectual short stories. What was being written then was mostly about life in the countryside and social life. When I wrote my first short stories I was told they had Joycean influences.

Of course, Gabriel García Márquez’s writer’s origin story begins with drawing cartoons.

What is it about drawing that fuels other creative pursuits?

From: The Paris Review Issue 82, Winter 1981

Interview by: Peter Stone

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amreading architecture Art Commonplace Book Drawings

Drawing lessons from Architect Matthew Frederick pt.2


Every drawing you undertake has a hierarchy. There are the general elements. And there are the fine details.

Matthew Frederick recommends laying out the entire drawing to start.

How?

By making use of:

Light guide lines.

Geometric alignments.

Visual gut-checks.

These techniques will help ensure the proportions and placement of shapes are accurate.

After that hit the details. But don’t over indulge in one place:

When you achieve some success at this schematic level, move to the next level of detail. If you find yourself focusing on details in a specific area of the drawing, indulge briefly, then move to other areas of the drawing.

Matthew Frederick
Let the light guide lines be your guide.

From: 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School

By: Matthew Frederick

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amreading architecture Art Commonplace Book Drawings

Drawing lessons from Architect Matthew Frederick pt.1


It all begins with the line.

Different lines have different purposes. But remember – begin and end your line with emphasis.

Be bold!

Have the lines overlap where they meet.

Be bold!

Don’t “Feather and Fuzz”.

Be bold!

Start and end your line in one stroke. To build confidence, Matthew Frederick suggests drawing a light guide line before drawing the final line.

From: 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School

By: Matthew Frederick

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4Panel Friday amreading Art comics Drawings

Four Panel Friday: J.R.R.Tolkien’s drawings of Entrances to the Elvenking’s halls



Ok. These aren’t exactly comic panels.

But the more I go through old books during this time spent at home, the more I discover “four panels” in other parts of literature.

Tolkien’s perspective and line variation are impressive. He incorporates straight lines, diagonal and curved lines, stipples, blacked out inks.

The man was non-stop.

From: The Art of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

By: Wayne G. Hammond, Christina Scull

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4Panel Friday amreading Art comics Drawings

Four Panel Friday, plus a cover, and an extra panel (on Sunday): All Star Squadron #28



I remember this All Star Squadron issue being a Justice League comic. Turns out it’s the Justice Society.

Justice who? What kind of bench warming Justice League is this?

Hold up. Learn your comics history J.

The Justice Society was the first superhero team to ever appear in D.C. Comics.

They’re the godfather and godmothers of the superhero team-up game. Respect due.

From: All Star Squadron #28

By: Roy Thomas, Richard Howell, and Gerald Forton

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Art Drawings

Drawing Assignment, Cours de dessin: Eyelids

Inspired by a Van Gogh Museum tweet, I picked up this Cours de dessin book and took off.

I mean, if it worked for Van Gogh…


Me

I’m amazed how a few curved and diagonal lines can render such an intricate part of the human face.

Cours
Categories
Art comics Drawings writer's inspiration

Cartoonist Lynda Barry keeps us going


I remember picking four comics that I was going to read for the rest of my life. And one of those was Family Circus.

Lynda Barry

Let Lynda Barry’s encouraging words on drawing and Canada and Family Circus, help you through today.

Then go make some marks. Doodle. Sketch. Write a few bad sentences. Edit. Draw some more. Read.

Keep going.


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4Panel Friday amreading Art comics Drawings

Four Panel Friday: Archie #1


Riverdale Drama

Two stories in 4 panels.

Betty approaching, and then turning away from Archie is a story on its own.

From: Archie #1

By: Mark Waid and Fiona Staples