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amreading architecture Art Commonplace Book Drawings

Drawing Lessons from Architect Matthew Frederick pt.3 Architectural Hand-Lettering


Handwriting, penmanship, this is all drawing. Hand-lettering can be another artistic tool to add to your kit.

Matthew Frederick shares 6 architectural hand-lettering principals to follow:

1. Honor legibility and consistency above all else.

2. Use guide lines (actual or imagined) to ensure uniformity.

3. Emphasize the beginning and end of all strokes, and overlap them slightly where they meet – just as in drawing lines.

4. Give your horizontal strokes a slight upward tilt. If they slope downward, your letters will look tired.

5. Give curved strokes a balloon-like fullness.

6. Give careful attention to the amount of white space between letters. An E, for example, will need more space when following an I than when coming after an S or T.

Matthew Frederick

This week, for fun, find ways to practice your architectural hand-lettering.

Write a thank-you note.

Write a love letter.

Write a haiku.

Then mail it out it to your lover, mother, or bestie.

Be sure to practice your hand-lettering on the to and from address on the envelope as well.

You’ll get some practice in, and they will receive a special gift.

Source: 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School, Matthew Frederick, pg 22

Categories
Design

The Origin of Teletype Monocase Font


Doyald Young invented Teletype Monocase font in 1965.

Teletype was a precursor to SMS messages. A digital method for sending text between phone lines.

But there was one problem.

Teletype couldn’t handle upper or lower case letters.

Doyald Young was brought into to solve this problem. He was tasked with creating a font that would appear set in lower-case, but not offend its recipients when their proper names weren’t capitalized.

The monocase font was never used.

It was quote:

“was hard to read and didn’t fool anybody,”

An engineer

Source: Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots: California and Graphic Design, 1936-1986, by Louise Sandhaus, Lorraine Wild, Denise Gonzales Crisp, pg.96

Categories
amreading architecture Art Commonplace Book Drawings

Drawing lessons from Architect Matthew Frederick pt.2


Every drawing you undertake has a hierarchy. There are the general elements. And there are the fine details.

Matthew Frederick recommends laying out the entire drawing to start.

How?

By making use of:

Light guide lines.

Geometric alignments.

Visual gut-checks.

These techniques will help ensure the proportions and placement of shapes are accurate.

After that hit the details. But don’t over indulge in one place:

When you achieve some success at this schematic level, move to the next level of detail. If you find yourself focusing on details in a specific area of the drawing, indulge briefly, then move to other areas of the drawing.

Matthew Frederick
Let the light guide lines be your guide.

From: 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School

By: Matthew Frederick

Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics Drawings

Four Panel Friday: J.R.R.Tolkien’s drawings of Entrances to the Elvenking’s halls



Ok. These aren’t exactly comic panels.

But the more I go through old books during this time spent at home, the more I discover “four panels” in other parts of literature.

Tolkien’s perspective and line variation are impressive. He incorporates straight lines, diagonal and curved lines, stipples, blacked out inks.

The man was non-stop.

From: The Art of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

By: Wayne G. Hammond, Christina Scull

Categories
Poems

Doodling


Mindless drawings fill

pages with rockets, monsters,

and bug eyed portraits.

Categories
amreading Art Drawings

Jason Polan Tributes



You couldn’t look at Jason’s drawings and not be compelled to draw.

Two heartfelt tributes to an inspirational artist:

Draw whatever you want, by Austin Kleon

No One Looked at New York Like Jason Polan, by Jerry Saltz

Categories
Commonplace Book writer's inspiration

A Christmas window story from Chuck Palahniuk


Another Christmas window story.  Almost every morning, I eat breakfast in the same diner, and this morning a man was painting the windows with Christmas designs.  Snowmen.  Snowflakes.  Bells.  Santa Claus.  He stood outside on the sidewalk, painting in the freezing cold, his breath steaming, alternating brushes and rollers with different colors of paint.  Inside the diner, the customers and servers watched as he layered red and white and blue paint on the outside of the big windows.  Behind him the rain changed to snow, falling sideways in the wind. 

The painter’s hair was all different colors of gray, and his face was slack and wrinkled as the empty ass of his jeans.  Between colors, he’d stop to drink something out of a paper cup. 

Watching him from inside, eating eggs and toast, somebody said it was sad.  This customer said the man was probably a failed artist.  It was probably whiskey in the cup.  He probably had a studio full of failed paintings and now made his living decorating cheesy restaurant and grocery store windows.  Just sad, sad, sad.

This painter guy kept putting up the colors.  All the white “snow,” first.  Then some fields of red and green.  Then some black outlines that made the color shapes into Xmas stockings and trees.

A server walked around, pouring coffee for people, and said, “That’s so neat.  I wish I could do that…”

And whether we envied or pitied this guy in the cold, he kept painting.  Adding details and layers of color.  And I’m not sure when it happened, but at some moment he wasn’t there.  The pictures themselves were so rich, they filled the windows so well, the colors so bright, that the painter had left.  Whether he was a failure or a hero.  He’d disappeared, gone off to wherever, and all we were seeing was his work.

For homework, ask your family and friends what you were like as a child.  Better yet, ask them what they were like as children.  Then, just listen.

Merry Christmas, and thank you for reading my work.

Chuck Palahniuk

From the essay: Stocking Stuffers: 13 Writing Tips From Chuck Palahniuk


Categories
Art

Motorbike from the Future

Do. You. See. It?

I pass this tag everyday. I’m surprised it hasn’t been wiped away yet.

It looks like a motorbike from the future jumping off the past.

There’s no seat. You magnetically hover above the frame.

There’s no handlebars. You steer by telepathy.

Crazy thought?

Yes.

But this is where we’re headed.

Categories
Art

Patterns and Murals at Twisted Trompo


Welcome to Twisted Trompo.

The food is bite after bite scrumptious. But visually, the Twisted Trompo is fun to look at too.

The paisley patterned tiles give the bar a flourish.

The painted cement between the cinder blocks light the walls. How did they get the color to come out so vivid?

And the mural above the bar had me staring and searching for new techniques.

Unfortunately, I didn’t get the artist’s name. But shoutout, whoever you are.

I dig the thick, strong lines around each subject. It’s part comic book panel, part fine painting. Question though – What’s the top’s significance?

Twisted Trompo is a reminder that what surrounds you while you eat – friends, strangers, staff and art, is as important as the food.

Menu recommendation: If you’re a carnivore, order the Torta Cubana. It’s a meat theme park you’ll never forget.

Categories
amreading Art Commonplace Book

Notes from The Natural Way to Draw pt.2 : The Way to Learn to Draw

The way to learn to draw is by drawing. People who make art must not merely know about it. For an artist, the important thing is not how much he knows, but how much he can do. A scientist may know all about aeronautics without being able to handle an airplane. It is only by flying that he can develop the senses for flying. If I were asked what one thing more than any other would teach a student how to draw, I should answer, ‘Drawing – incessantly, furiously, painstakingly drawing.’

The Natural Way to Draw, Nicolaïdes, Kimon

An artist must have skin in the game.

The work, the practice of drawing everyday, is the path to improvement.