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Statesmen and Copywork

Continuing with the copywork exploration.

Before he served as the second President of the United States, John Adams was an ambitious young lawyer. To help master the craft of law, he kept a “literary” commonplace book. In it he copied passages of books he admired.

But after attending several sessions of the local court, he felt himself “irresistibly impelled” to the law. In the meantime, he was reading Milton, Virgil, Voltaire, Viscount Bolingbroke’s Letters on the Study and Use of History, and copying long extracts in a literary commonplace book.

John Adams, David McCullough, pg 39

But according to Founders Online, Adams didn’t collect quotations in his commonplace book:

Adams did not collect quotations in his Commonplace Book, but what appear to be abstracts of pertinent passages drawn either from his reading in legal works such as Doctor and Student, Instructor Clericalis, and the reports, or from the notebooks of others at the bar.

Founders Online, Editorial Note, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/05-01-02-0001-0001-0001

As John Adam’s professional development confirms, keeping a commonplace book is a timeless practice.