Graphic Design In the Wild – Day 10: Bagel King

Bagel King first appeared in Central Florida in 1977. The founders, Frank and Tina Perrotta opened the first location was in Winter Park. Their mission? Delight customers with NY style bagels.

Problem was, many Winter Park residents in 1977 didn’t know what a bagel was. But the local Jewish community spread the word and boom! 44 years later Bagel King is still thriving.

Their logo, “the royal bagel” we’ll call it, does have an early 90s clip-art feel. The Star of David on the crown, harkens back to Bagel King’s New York roots. But that’s all part of its charm. Bagel King doesn’t need some modern logo to validate it. Its logo, and it’s bagels get the job done.

Graphic Design In the Wild – Day 4: Bird Scooters

Throughout the history of graphic design, logos emblazoned with wings are a mainstay.

You have the Detroit Red Wings, Redwing Shoes, The Athlete’s Foot, Birdman’s forehead insignia

But the electric scooter company Bird, locked up the “winged” logo game for at least the next 6 months. It’s simple (only 7 lines). It’s distinct (recognizable 30 feet away). And still looks dope sweaty and beaten down.

And going back for seconds, Bird gives you three logos for one. Look close. Can you see the pair of wheels? The pair of raptor eyes? The pair of wings?

Graphic Design In the Wild – Day 3: Papa Lopez Mexican Cantina Restroom Signage

I can’t resist hand-painted lettering. A steady hand and brush can enliven any space. Even a restroom hallway.

Papa Lopez Cantina understands this. It would’ve been cheaper, and still effective, to slap the old Men and Women restroom signage to the doors. But somebody in the Papa Lopez art department believed in better.

Look close. You can still see the paint drying.

NEW PROJECT: Graphic Design In the Wild

Greeting friends!

Starting tomorrow we’re beginning a new project, Graphic Design In the Wild.

The goal? Capture a piece of graphic design in the physical world, for each day of April.

The two criteria for a daily piece are these:

1. The piece exists in the physical world. We can hold it, touch it.

2. The piece catches our eye.

I’ve wanted to do a project like this for a while, but fear and complacency have held me back.

Sometimes you have to leap.

See you tommorrow.

Robin Rendle’s Gorgeous Essay on Newsletters

I haven’t been surprised by the internet in a while. There’s all the common rants:

Social media sucks! Social media is the life changing wonder stick!

Substack sucks! Subtsack is majestical!

The 90s was the best decade ever! No! The 60s were utopia!

And all the other back-and-forth of opinions and wild fantasies that the internet harbors.

But then Robin Rendle‘s essay fell into my inbox – twice. (H.T. Austin Kleon and Alan Jacobs) His love note to newsletters and hope of a web for all, made for a bout of I’m finishing-this-damn-essay reading.

But it’s how he unleashed his essay, that shook my internet insides:

Using a combination of oldtimey illustrations, and funny, direct copy, he kills.

But it’s the scroll-and-read format of the essay which made it as memorable as the essay itself. I felt like I was slaloming through the piece rather than reading it.

Screenshots are weak.

Experience, read, view, contemplate, or disagree with Robin’s essay in it’s entirety below: