Drawing lessons from Architect Matthew Frederick pt.2


Every drawing you undertake has a hierarchy. There are the general elements. And there are the fine details.

Matthew Frederick recommends laying out the entire drawing to start.

How?

By making use of:

Light guide lines.

Geometric alignments.

Visual gut-checks.

These techniques will help ensure the proportions and placement of shapes are accurate.

After that hit the details. But don’t over indulge in place:

When you achieve some success at this schematic level, move to the next level of detail. If you find yourself focusing on details in a specific area of the drawing, indulge briefly, then move to other areas of the drawing.

Matthew Frederick
Let the light guide lines be your guide.

From: 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School

By: Matthew Frederick

Four Panel Friday (on Saturday): Austin Kleon’s Keep Going


Nothing to see here…

With my comics tucked away in storage I relied on happenstance for this weeks post. I was flipping through Austin Kleon’s book – Keep Going, and then POW! Mission accomplished.

Kleon doesn’t consider himself a cartoonist but he’s drawn and posted so many of these he’s becoming dangerously close.

An incredible toilet read, Keep Going is definitely a must purchase.

From: Keep Going – 10 Ways to Stay Creative In Good Times and Bad

By: Austin Kleon

Four Panel Friday: J.R.R.Tolkien’s drawings of Entrances to the Elvenking’s halls



Ok. These aren’t exactly comic panels.

But the more I go through old books during this time spent at home, the more I discover “four panels” in other parts of literature.

Tolkien’s perspective and line variation are impressive. He incorporates straight lines, diagonal and curved lines, stipples, blacked out inks.

The man was non-stop.

From: The Art of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

By: Wayne G. Hammond, Christina Scull

Four Panel Friday, plus a cover, and an extra panel (on Sunday): All Star Squadron #28



I remember this All Star Squadron issue being a Justice League comic. Turns out it’s the Justice Society.

Justice who? What kind of bench warming Justice League is this?

Hold up. Learn your comics history J.

The Justice Society was the first superhero team to ever appear in D.C. Comics.

They’re the godfather and godmothers of the superhero team-up game. Respect due.

From: All Star Squadron #28

By: Roy Thomas, Richard Howell, and Gerald Forton