Four Panel Friday (on Saturday): The Complete Peanuts 1950-1952


First seen in circulation February 52′

Could this strip be inspired from Schulz’s childhood? His father did own a barbershop in Minnesota.

Or taken from his own weekly visits to the barber?

The line Yes, sir, “It pays to look well” is subtle but real. I’ve never had my hair cut during the 1950’s, but that sounds like true old timey barber-speak to me.

From: The Complete Peanuts 1950-1952 (Vol. 1)

By: Charles M. Schulz

Four Panel Friday: Marvel Comics Star Wars #11 – Star Search!


Two horizontal panels, two vertical panels. In case you’re keeping track.

Long before Disney owned Marvel Comics and Star Wars, Marvel Comics Group held the publishing rights to Star Wars comics.

Then shit got weird – for Han Solo in particular.

In this expanded universe Han meets a space rabbit named Jaxxon, wields a light sabre, teams up with a man dressed up in a Chewbacca Halloween costume, and rescues a bald librarian Jedi wannabe named Don-Wan from an intergalactic dinosaur.

Like we said. Shit got weird.

From: Star Wars Omnibus: A Long Time Ago… Vol. 1

By: Archie Goodwin, Carmine Infantino, Terry Austin

James Thurber's Idling


To release some of his jumpy energy and his mind’s ceaseless inventorying and inquisitiveness, Thurber drew. It was as habitual as his smoking. Writing-rewriting, as he often called it- required discipline, focus, research, an amped-up armature of full brain power that included memory, grammar, word and sentence sounds, a dialing in of the humorous of and the heartfelt, the meandering and the meaningful. But drawings? He considered his to be fluid, spontaneous, unhindered, and with rarely a need for erasure, revision, or polish. His daughter Rosemary remembers her father saying that he could even whistle while he drew.

A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber, by Michael J. Rosen

If you’re looking for some artistic inspiration, or need to smile, pick up A Mile and a Half of Lines. After skimming through five or ten pages you’ll be feening to pick up a pencil and draw.

Four Panel Friday (on Saturday): A Spirit Layout


Mr. Q predicts the future.

A Four Panel Friday first – layouts instead of completed work. This from an unpublished Spirit story titled: The Cigar.

Important note – Klaus Nordling drew these layouts, not Will Eisner.

Good example of solid panel framing here. Nordling goes from a relative close up of Mr. Q, to framing him between the two henchman. Sweet stache’ on the driver too.

From: Will Eisner: Champion of the Graphic Novel

By: Paul Levitz