Graphic Design In the Wild – Day 16: LAFC Crest

As the MLS season opens this weekend, I thought we should celebrate with the LAFC crest.

This is one of my favorite football crests, period. The Pitch Black (#000000), California Gold (#c39e6d) color scheme stands out amongst its MLS counterparts. And as I mentioned before, I can’t resist a logo with a well placed “wing”.

When tasked with designing the crest of Los Angeles’ new soccer team, designer Matthew Wolff dug into Los Angeles’ cultural past. What’s amazing is how much of her cultural past he fit into the mark.

The “wing” is a nod to the City of Angels, Aztec Eagles, and Art Deco symbolism. The gold and black palette gives off the air of L.A.’s grit and glamour. And the wordmark is inspired by L.A.’s Art Deco architecture.

A brilliant design, one worth reflecting on often.

Check out Matthew Wolff’s design inspirations for LAFC’s identity here.

Soccer in Random Places: The Dangerous Book for Boys and the joy of practice


With libraries and bookstores closed I’ve returned to my own shelves. During a session of pull-any-book-off-the-shelf and read game, I stumbled on this excerpt from The Dangerous Book for Boys.

Titled: The Rules of Soccer, it reminded me of the joys of practice.



Soccer is the example, but the idea of practice, daily practice, applies to any discipline:

It’s an old, old phrase, but “practice makes perfect” is as true today as it was hundreds of years ago. Natural-born skill is all very well, but it will only take you so far against someone who has practiced every day at something he loves.


Further reading:

How I practice at what I do – by Tyler Cowen

People who have not yet succeeded but maybe they will – by henryeoliver

Learn Like an Athlete – by David Perell

An appreciation of Lionel Messi, from the Paris Review?


You’re standing in one place, one patch of grass on a sunny Saturday afternoon in Seville, playing a game, which is to say doing your job, which is playing a game. A ball floats in the air toward you. You’re in one place and you’re in all possible places. Your name is stamped between your shoulder blades. You turn your back away from the ball. We all know who you are. You balance yourself and focus. What you’re about to do has no name.

From: They Think They Know You, Lionel Messi. By: Rowan Ricardo Phillips. The Paris Review, February 26 2019

I love finding pieces on footballers from outside of traditional football journalism. Especially when a masterful writer can share a new vision.

Rowan Ricardo Phillips accomplishes a rare feat with his Paris Review piece: They Think They Know You, Lionel Messi. He helps us relish, treasure again, this moment where we still have the opportunity to watch Lionel Messi at the peak of his powers.

Rowan reminds us not to take it for granted.

It Begins with Cruyff


‘Every disadvantage has its advantage’, ‘The game always begins afterwards’ , ‘If I wanted you to understand it, I would have explained it better’…

From: Brilliant Orange: The Neurotic genius of Dutch football. Winner, David. pg 4.

A proper Dutch football book always opens with a few Johan Cryuff maxims.

Blaise Matuidi’s surprising admirer


Blaise Matuidi has many admirers. Us and Carlo Ancelloti among them.

But he also has a surprising fan boy.

Pep Guardiola.

At first glance, Blaise doesn’t possess the ideal qualities of a Pep Guardiola player. His technique on the ball can be clumsy. His passing range is limited. Yet Blaise still managed to leave an impression on Pep.

Former Clairefontaine youth coach Francisco Filho shares the story:

We had just finished a tournament in Las Palmas. We won. Pep Guardiola was there, on holiday. Alongside his brother, who was organising the tournament, we dined together. He saw our match and he said to me: ‘When I will be manager (he was still playing in Qatar at the time), I want a player like your #6.’ Who was it? Blaise Matuidi.”

Shout out to Get French Football News for originally sharing the story.