Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics

Four Panel Friday: Aaron Linton’s Found Object Comics



Aaron Linton? A mystery.

His website is simple. A two page nav – Images and Contact.

No “about me”. No “start here”.

I dig.

No Twitter. No Facebook. Not even instagram.

I dig even more.

Only a collection of stunning images assembled with mixed materials.

His art is like stop motion animation on pause.

Have a look: https://www.aaronlinton.com/

From: Comics: Easy as ABC! The Essential Guide to Comics for Kids

By: Ivan Brunetti

Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics

Four Panel Friday: Brian Roppel’s Force of Habit



Brian Roppel’s comics are action packed. His panels explode with movement.

Looking at his art brings back the same delight I got watching Nicktoons as a kid.

Based in Toronto, Brian works in multiple mediums – comics, illustration, and animation.

Check out his back catalog here.

From: Comics: Easy as ABC! The Essential Guide to Comics for Kids

By: Ivan Brunetti

Categories
amreading Commonplace Book Drawings interviews writer's inspiration

Gabriel García Márquez on how drawing led to writing.

INTERVIEWER

How did you start writing?

GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ

By drawing. By drawing cartoons. Before I could read or write I used to draw comics at school and at home. The funny thing is that I now realize that when I was in high school I had the reputation of being a writer, though I never in fact wrote anything. If there was a pamphlet to be written or a letter of petition, I was the one to do it because I was supposedly the writer. When I entered college I happened to have a very good literary background in general, considerably above the average of my friends. At the university in Bogotá, I started making new friends and acquaintances, who introduced me to contemporary writers. One night a friend lent me a book of short stories by Franz Kafka. I went back to the pension where I was staying and began to read The Metamorphosis. The first line almost knocked me off the bed. I was so surprised. The first line reads, “As Gregor Samsa awoke that morning from uneasy dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect. . . .” When I read the line I thought to myself that I didn’t know anyone was allowed to write things like that. If I had known, I would have started writing a long time ago. So I immediately started writing short stories. They are totally intellectual short stories because I was writing them on the basis of my literary experience and had not yet found the link between literature and life. The stories were published in the literary supplement of the newspaper El Espectador in Bogotá and they did have a certain success at the time—probably because nobody in Colombia was writing intellectual short stories. What was being written then was mostly about life in the countryside and social life. When I wrote my first short stories I was told they had Joycean influences.

Of course, Gabriel García Márquez’s writer’s origin story begins with drawing cartoons.

What is it about drawing that fuels other creative pursuits?

From: The Paris Review Issue 82, Winter 1981

Interview by: Peter Stone

Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics

Four Panel Friday: Mark Connery’s A Tragedy



Mark Connery‘s Rudy has a long history. Rudy’s been appearing in mini-comics since the early 90s.

Mark’s comics are punk. His distribution is punk. His publisher – 2dcloud is punk.

As this 2014 Comics Journal review by Robert Kirby describes:

Connery, a Torontonian, has been producing his minis and comics himself, distributing them through the mail or anonymously dropping copies at punk shows, libraries, and on public transit, leaving a portion of his readership up to the vagaries of fate. Very punk indeed.

From: Comics: Easy as ABC! The Essential Guide to Comics for Kids

By: Ivan Brunetti

Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics

Four Panel Friday: Stormy Weather



One of the best parts of doing Four Panel Friday each week is discovering new cartoonists.

Today, Erik Nebel steps to the drafting table. He’s currently at work “on a bunch of comics projects”.

What will he conjure up?

From: Comics: Easy as ABC! The Essential Guide to Comics for Kids

By: Ivan Brunetti

Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics

Four Panel Friday: The Magician


Magic Y’all

Davide Bart Salvemini is an Italian cartoonist based in Bologna. He describes his style as Psicheledelico.

The clouds shifting positions and changing shapes between panels helps indicate time passing.

With only four panels, each line needs to move the story forward.

From: Comics: Easy as ABC! The Essential Guide to Comics for Kids

By: Ivan Brunetti

Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics

Four Panel Friday (on Saturday): Little Buddies



Up this week is cartoonist Alex Schubert. Alex’s strips were regularly featured in Vice.

Here Alex demonstrates how simple shapes, spread across four panels, can tell a story.

From: Comics: Easy as ABC! The Essential Guide to Comics for Kids

By: Ivan Brunetti

Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics

Four Panel Friday: Turning the Lights Back On


More stumbling around

Mark Laliberte comes up with a bright idea. Perfect fodder for Four Panel Friday.

Read more 4 Panel delights at Mark’s site – The 4PANEL Project.

From: Comics: Easy as ABC! The Essential Guide to Comics for Kids

By: Ivan Brunetti

Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics

Four Panel Friday (on Saturday): Austin Kleon’s Keep Going


Nothing to see here…

With my comics tucked away in storage I relied on happenstance for this weeks post. I was flipping through Austin Kleon’s book – Keep Going, and then POW! Mission accomplished.

Kleon doesn’t consider himself a cartoonist but he’s drawn and posted so many of these he’s becoming dangerously close.

An incredible toilet read, Keep Going is definitely a must purchase.

From: Keep Going – 10 Ways to Stay Creative In Good Times and Bad

By: Austin Kleon

Categories
4Panel Friday amreading Art comics Drawings

Four Panel Friday, plus a cover, and an extra panel (on Sunday): All Star Squadron #28



I remember this All Star Squadron issue being a Justice League comic. Turns out it’s the Justice Society.

Justice who? What kind of bench warming Justice League is this?

Hold up. Learn your comics history J.

The Justice Society was the first superhero team to ever appear in D.C. Comics.

They’re the godfather and godmothers of the superhero team-up game. Respect due.

From: All Star Squadron #28

By: Roy Thomas, Richard Howell, and Gerald Forton