Four Panel Friday: Marvel Comics Star Wars #11 – Star Search!


Two horizontal panels, two vertical panels. In case you’re keeping track.

Long before Disney owned Marvel Comics and Star Wars, Marvel Comics Group held the publishing rights to Star Wars comics.

Then shit got weird – for Han Solo in particular.

In this expanded universe Han meets a space rabbit named Jaxxon, wields a light sabre, teams up with a man dressed up in a Chewbacca Halloween costume, and rescues a bald librarian Jedi wannabe named Don-Wan from an intergalactic dinosaur.

Like we said. Shit got weird.

From: Star Wars Omnibus: A Long Time Ago… Vol. 1

By: Archie Goodwin, Carmine Infantino, Terry Austin

Four Panel Friday (on Saturday): A Spirit Layout


Mr. Q predicts the future.

A Four Panel Friday first – layouts instead of completed work. This from an unpublished Spirit story titled: The Cigar.

Important note – Klaus Nordling drew these layouts, not Will Eisner.

Good example of solid panel framing here. Nordling goes from a relative close up of Mr. Q, to framing him between the two henchman. Sweet stache’ on the driver too.

From: Will Eisner: Champion of the Graphic Novel

By: Paul Levitz

Four Panel Friday: Erik Larsen’s Savage Dragon -This Savage World


Plan B

It’s wild.

Savage Dragon was an idea from Erik Larsen’s youth that grew with him into adulthood.

Larsen’s Dragon cracked apart the general superhero story in two ways. (I’m sure there’s more than 2, but for now…)

Savage Dragon is a police officer. The typical super hero trope is a masked gymnast turned vigilante.

Chicago is Dragon’s home. Chicago isn’t as hipster cool as say, Des Moines, Iowa. But it also isn’t New York City, Metropolis, Gotham, Queens or any other NY alias that every other superhero pays crazy rent to live in.

From: This Savage World (Savage Dragon, Vol. 15)

By Eric Larsen

Four Panel Friday: Making Comics – Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Manga, and Graphic Novels


Collabo

There’s plenty of how-to guides for making comics out there. Still, I can’t think of one as comprehensive as Scott McCloud‘s Making Comics.

Though first published in 2006, Making Comics: Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Manga, and Graphic Novels holds up. Even chapter 7, The Comics Professional, still shares sage advice to aspiring comic writers and artists alike.

The influence of Lone Wolf and Cub on present day cartoonists


This Criterion Channel Studio Visits episode details the extensive influence Lone Wolf and Cub has had on comic creators.

Paul Pope shares how Lone Wolf and Cub brought the manga tradition of emphasizing character development over traditional three act plots.

Larry Hama explains how the fight scenes are depicted differently from their American counterparts. Lone Wolf and Cub uses cause and effect. A swing of the sword from character could be parried or missed by character B. This sequence would be reflected in the following panel.

Ronald Wimberly describes how mark making can communicate as its own language.

Neil Gaiman on that bastard medium – comics


A comic tends to be a small enough, personal enough, medium that a creator can just make art, tell stories, and see if anyone wants to read them. Not having to be liked is enormously liberating. The comic is, joyfully, a bastard medium that has borrowed its vocabulary and ideas from literature, science fiction, poetry, fine art, diaries, film, and illustration. It would be nice to think that comics, and those of us who come from a comics background, bring something special to film. An insouciance, perhaps, or a willingness to do our learning and experimenting in public.

Neil Gaiman, The View from the cheap seats, On Comics and Films: 2006. Pg 224.

I won’t lie here. I did have to look up insouciance.