The Origin of Teletype Monocase Font


Doyald Young invented Teletype Monocase font in 1965.

Teletype was a precursor to SMS messages. A digital method for sending text between phone lines.

But there was one problem.

Teletype couldn’t handle upper or lower case letters.

Doyald Young was brought into to solve this problem. He was tasked with creating a font that would appear set in lower-case, but not offend it’s recipients when their proper names weren’t capitalized.

The monocase font was never used.

It was quote:

“was hard to read and didn’t fool anybody,”

An engineer

Source: Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots: California and Graphic Design, 1936-1986, by Louise Sandhaus, Lorraine Wild, Denise Gonzales Crisp, pg.96

Street Art: Magic Kingdom edition

The Magic Kingdom is a city all it’s own.

Bridges rise and fall. Smooth, paved, concrete roads twist through the four Disney burroughs: Fantasyland, Frontierland, Tomorrowland, and Adventure land.

It has it own barber shop. It’s own Main Street. And the Walt Disney World railroad provides it’s citizens with a well run public transportation system.

Walt don’t play either. All trains run on schedule.

As with any vibrant city though, street art is everywhere.

Hand painted signs. Tiled tapestries. Sculptures.

Walt Disney’s love of art lives well beyond the animation table.

Rules to Art by. From the Immaculate Heart College

Read often

As scanned from my favorite book right now: Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots: California and Graphic Design, 1936-1986

By: Louise Sandhaus

With contributions from Denise Gonzales Crisp, Lorraine Wild, and Michael Worthington.

These rules were written by a class taught by Sister Corita Kent. Calligraphy credits: David Mekelberg, 1968

Rule 5 sticks out most. Develop self discipline by surrounding yourself with wise and smart people.

An excellent rule for all of life.

The Thunderbird Rink Logo Caws out

47 years of Plano skating madness.

Of referees skating backwards.

Of youth group events and birthday parties.

Of Roller Derbys and makeout sessions.

But most of all, it’s 47 years of that irresistible, hand painted, 8-bit Atari graphics Thunderbird logo.

Endangered Species

It’s street art at it’s best. It’s street art SMT:

Simple. Memorable. Timeless.

Ok. SMT is not a thing, but since the moment I drove past it, the Thunderbird logo nested into my memory.

It’s piece of Plano, nigh Dallas history.

Read up on the Thunderbird Roller Rink in this Plano Magazine piece by Kaci Lahpor

Trippin’ off 7 lines

The Bird scooter’s logo made me do a double take. Triple take even.

With only 7 lines my mind produced 3 three different images.

I saw racing wheels speeding underneath the wheel guards.

I saw a stoned, grinning, robot who forgot to trim his eyebrows.

And I saw wings pressed back against the deck, while a terrified tourist flies towards a stoplight.

What do you see?